• Donna Hechler Porter

Amanda Cruse, possible grandchild of Jeremiah Cruse & Elizabeth Harland

This was part of a continuing series on the grandchildren of Jeremiah Crews and Elizabeth Harland that was published first on my original blog. I repost it here as that blog is online but no longer active. As usual, most of this information, unless otherwise stated, comes from Marian Kay Cruse Abbott.


Amanda Cruse born 29 March 1865 in Prairieton, Vigo County, Indiana, was the only daughter born to Zachariah Cruse and Rachel Lane (1). She was between 11 and 15 when her parents died sometime between 1876 and 1880. I have been unable to determine who she lived with after her parent's death.


On 24 August 1895, Amanda married Isaac Henry Burner, the son of Newton Burner and Sarah Fallon, in Clark County, Illinois (2). Henry was 21 years her senior, so that at the time of their marriage, Amanda was 20 and Henry was 41, having been born on 24 January 1854 in Licking County, Ohio. He was first married to Ida Dolittle of Crawford County, Illinois (3). Ida died on 22 September 1892, after which Henry married Amanda (4). Amanda and Henry had only one child - Blanche May Burner, born on 2 July 1899 (4). Amanda was 34 at the time of Blanche's birth.


One of several pictures found on Ancestry.com.


Amanda and Henry are found in the 1900 Clark, Johnson County, Illinois census, along with daughter, Blanche May Burner, who was a month shy of a year old (9). Nine years later, on 9 August 1906 in Illinois, Henry died. The following is an excerpt from Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Clark County (4):


The deceased was a Democrat, but had no ambition for office or public honors. He belonged to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Orange Township, and was buried in the cemetery near the church. Mrs. Burner is also identified with the work of the Cumberland Church and is a lady of standing and influence. At the time of his death Mr. Burner was the owner of his original purchase of forty acres, which constituted the family homestead and upon which most of his children were born. Although he had leased the land to prospectors, no wells had been drilled; now, however, three fine wells are in operation, with an average flow of 250 barrels daily.


Henry was buried in Butternut-Willow Creek, Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery (7).


In the 1920 census, Amanda and Blanche are living with Amanda's brother-in-law, 75 year old John Lingafelter in Johnson, Clark County, Illinois (5). John was the husband of Henry's sister, Almeda Burner (8). Amanda was 53 and Blanch was 20. By 1930, Amanda and Blanche had moved to Casey, still in Clark County, Illinois. Amanda owned her home on N. 10th Street (6).

Amanda survived Henry by 34 years, passing away on 19 January 1940 in Casey, Clark County, Illinois. She was buried beside her husband (1).

Picture courtesy of www.findagrave.com

SOURCES:

1. Ancestry.com. Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

2. Jordan Dodd and Liahona Research, comp.. Illinois, Marriage Index, 1851-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

3. Ida Dolittle brought three children into the marriage - Earlie E Wilson, Arthur Wilson, and Sarah Wilson. It is possible her marriage to Henry was her third marriage.

4. Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Clark County. (Chicago: Middle West Publishing Company, 1907), biography of Isaac Henry Burner found on pages 711-712.

5. 1920 U. S. Federal Census, Clark County, Illinois, household of John P. Lingafelter.

6. 1930 U. S. Federal Census, Clark County, Illinois, household of Amanda Burner.

7. Entries from ww.findagrave.com for both Henry and Amanda. They share a headstone.

8. Jordan Dodd and Liahona Research, comp.. Illinois, Marriage Index, 1851-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

9. Census records courtesy of Marian Kay Cruse Abbott. I could not locate the census record on Ancestry, which means it is likely an aberration/misspelling of the name on the original rolls.

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